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In this always on, always connected society, we suffer from solitude deprivation.

I’m sitting here at my desk.

I’ve been up since 5:30am, it’s super quiet. And I’m taking this moment to appreciate solitude.

There’s something different about early morning. I mean, the obvious reason is that everyone is unconscious but in the early morning, there’s so much potential in the air.

Late nights have a different feel. Late nights, to me, feel creative.

Although these two liminal spaces are different in their look, feel and what they potentially offer, they share one important facilitator — solitude.


In this always on, always connected society, we suffer from solitude deprivation. In “Digital Minimalism” by Cal Newport, he defines solitude deprivation as:

“A state in which you spend close to zero time alone with your own thoughts and free from input from other minds.”

Solitude, in healthy doses, is important for the development of quality of life. From solitude comes quality thoughts, from quality thoughts come quality actions, quality actions build good habits and good habits build the life you want.

But don’t take my word for it. Make space for solitude and see what happens.

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